NexTV Africa & Middle East

Complete News World

Mering: Meringer Helper’s Heart Project: The school is growing in Africa

21 minutes ago

Plus
Meringer Margit Stroka is advancing her heart project with a school in Africa. How she used the locking time.

Margit Stroka further developed her heart program in Africa using the time she was locked up in Germany. The master hairdresser came back with good news Mering Then: “My club’s school is now fully operational with 350 children and a dozen teachers,” he says happily.

Due to the corona epidemic, the plant in Kenya had to close last year and its founder had to fight with strict health regulations. “Getting a plane with 60kg of luggage at the beginning of the year is not even easy,” he says. “It was empty at airports, and it was very tiring to walk around with a mask in temperatures above 30 degrees in Africa.”

Margit Stroka did a lot of work on her project

But Margit Stroka has not been too hard to support children in Kenya over the past few years with her non-profit organization Haguna Mata and raising donations for them. For example, on his 60th birthday in Mering, he organized a large African festival, the proceeds of which went to Africa and helped fund a Christmas campaign at Meringer Grammar School.

Stroka is about ten hours away from his project, in which he has invested a lot of work, money and time. “For ten years I have been supporting two school-age children in Kenya, learning their needs by interacting with local people,” he says.

In 2014 he finally founded his association Haguna Matata (meaning: Don’t worry, everything will be fine) and with his dedication won dozens of sponsors for girls and boys in urgent need of help. Because in everyday life we ​​certainly do not have one thing in the African village: cell phones, laptops or smartphones, or refrigerators, flat screen televisions or swollen supermarket shelves.

See also  Terrible healing donkey skin: Animals are almost extinct in China

Meringer’s Help Program: Children are ambitious

Despite compulsory schooling, most parents still did not have the opportunity to bring their children to school because the school was far away from the nearby villages. “But kids are ambitious and want to learn because education is their only chance,” says Stroka. In order to better communicate with the locals, he even learned Swahili, and the village of Maja Oni has now become his second home.

With remarkable enthusiasm, she talks about her commitment and life in Kenya, which has not always been easy for her as a European. Cook over a wood fire as people sleep on the bare earth. The 600 square meter property facility is certainly not as luxurious as the one million euro school in Germany, but by African standards: kindergarten groups, so-called elementary school classes, as well as a kitchen, toilets and a playground. “Now we were able to expand the first site to 20,000 euros,” he says.

In addition, Stroka has purchased another piece of land in which bananas, papayas, tomatoes and lemons are to be grown without artificial fertilizers. “We want to give this to the school, but also earn extra income through sales.” The president of the association is particularly pleased that two-thirds of the school is now self-supporting.

The locals call her “Madame Margit”, of whom she has made many friends over the years. “We were able to establish good relations with the government and local authorities so that everything is going smoothly.” After their return there was no time to process many new records and experiences from Africa. Because after her isolation, Margit Stroka was allowed to open her Meringue Salon lucky series, and hairy customers lined up to get a nice hairstyle after waiting for months.

See also  Surprise in La Liga! Barcelona lose points. Debbie is an amazing destination [WIDEO] Pinka Nona

You can also read about:

Titles are followed