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Macron launches his election campaign

With just over a week left until the first round of the presidential election, Emmanuel Macron delivered a fiery speech in front of nearly 30,000 supporters at a sports arena outside Paris.

The topic was packing. Against right-wing extremism and against laziness.

– The battle is here and now. “I don’t want to hear about arrogance or defeatism, I want to see mobilization,” he warned in his nearly three-hour speech on Saturday evening.

According to new polls, Macon leads and wins the second round of the elections, but by only six percentage points from Marine Le Pen and her National Assembly (formerly the National Front).

The 44-year-old may have stepped on stage accompanied by music and fireworks, but despite his confidence, he cautioned against taking election victory for granted.

Look at Brexit and many other elections, what seemed unimaginable has become a reality. And I stand here today to warn you: nothing is impossible.

And what he warns against is right-wing populists, Marine Le Pen and innovator Eric Zemmour.

“The risk of extremism has reached new levels in recent months and over the years, hatred and alternative realities have been normalized,” Macron said.

But he mostly talked about what he achieved so far during his time at the Elysee Palace and what he wants to do during the coming period – continuing to reduce unemployment and tax numbers and increase security in the country.

Whether he will get a chance to do so will be decided in two rounds, the first on April 10.

Facts: French presidential elections

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France holds presidential elections on April 10. If no candidate directly receives more than 50 percent of the vote, a decisive second round will be held on April 24 between the two who received the most votes in the first round.

The French can choose from a total of twelve candidates, listed here by those with the most support in recent polls:

Emmanuel Macron (Republic in Motion), Marine Le Pen (National Assembly), Jean-Luc Mélenchon (Occupied France), Valéry Pécresse (Republicans), Eric Zemmour (The Conquest), Yannick Gadot (The Greens), Fabien Roussel (French Communist Party) ), Jean LaSalle (We are resisting), Anne Hidalgo (Socialist Party), Nicolas Dupont-Aignan (The Rise of France), Philippe Bhutto (The New Anti-Capitalist Party) and Nathalie Artaud (Workers’ Struggle).

The president then elects the prime minister and appoints the government. This will be followed by a two-round parliamentary election in June, in which all 577 members of the House of Representatives, the National Assembly, will be elected.