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amazing! The impact of the meteor would have affected human life

United State. – A scientific team recently revealed that there is a possibility that the effect of a meteor It could be crucial to the development of human civilization. The group consists of experts from University of EdinburghScotland, United Kingdom, stressed that the fragments of the space rock, some 13,000 years ago, will be key to being able to gain knowledge about the life of humanity.

In this sense, it has been through an official statement issued by the Foundation, where it indicated that the effect of meteor It would have been devastating and thus caused the extinction of the dinosaurs. But there is a possibility that this coincided with some fundamental changes in the way pre-Neolithic human societies were organized in humans from the Fertile Crescent (Egypt, Iraq and Lebanon).

Therefore, it is believed that mankind was able to change its lifestyle, from being hunters and gatherers to farming, and with this begins to establish settlements permanently. Similarly, let’s remember that a large number of scientists confirmed that the impact of the meteorite initiated the climatic cooling that lasted more than a thousand years.

Source: Pixabay.

Meanwhile, experts from University of Edinburgh They stated that they had sufficient evidence to support this theory. In addition, they cited geological analysis of data belonging to four continents, with a particular focus on North America and Greenland, where the largest fragments of the meteorite are believed to have fallen. Despite this, they emphasized that the study would have to be more comprehensive to generate more specific data.

“It seems that this great cosmic cataclysm was commemorated on the giant stone pillars of Göbekli Tepe (Turkey), and was probably the ‘first temple in the world’, which is related to the origin of civilization in the Fertile Crescent of Southwest Asia. Did civilization begin with an explosion?” said the study author Martin Sweetman, who will publish the research in Earth Science Reviews.

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