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Japan will release Fukushima water

This is the water that has been used to cool the nuclear power plant, and the rain and groundwater that seep into the plant daily.

The Japanese government believes the drainage will be safe because the water has been purified so that almost all radioactivity disappears, and it will also be mitigated. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga has described it as an imperative mission of removing the water.

The United Nations Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) gives the green light, which is similar to emissions from other nuclear power plants around the world.

But neighbors South Korea and China have expressed concern about the plans. China calls it “extremely irresponsible,” writing in a statement on the Foreign Ministry’s website that Japan should wait for the emissions to consult with all concerned countries and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

The local fishing industry was angered by the decision, which it feared would hurt confidence in products from the area, which took years to build after the disaster.

They said they would not release the water into the sea without the support of the fishermen. We cannot support a measure that breaks that promise, says Kanji Tachia, who leads a local fisheries organization, to the NHK.

According to the government, pumping work is expected to start within two years at the earliest.

The tsunami of March 11, 2011 caused three collapses at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Residents were evacuated within a 20-kilometer radius of the nuclear power plant.

Fukushima’s economy, and especially agriculture, was hit hard by the disaster. Consumer confidence in products from the region has fallen sharply, despite the authorities ’promises that all food that arrives on store shelves has been controlled and classified as safe to enhance confidence. Some vegetables have also been provided with so-called QR codes, which customers can scan. To find out the current radiation levels in the farms that produce them.

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Fukushima’s tourism industry has also been hit hard, as there were much fewer tourists in the area before the pandemic.