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Millions of mice feed on Australia’s record harvest

In recent months, eastern Australia has been plagued by huge numbers of mice plowing cornfields and homes from Victoria in the south to Queensland in the north.

The cost of the damage to the grain and farm machinery is estimated to be in the millions of dollars, according to CNN.

The reason the rat exploded is because Australia saw a record harvest after more rain fell last year, the last two years together.

Sue Hodge cleans mouse excrement from kitchens and beds

Tell us cleaner Sue Hodge CNN Mice find their way home as winter approaches. She now has to clean the dead mice from her customers’ traps and mouse excrement from the kitchens, bedrooms and beds.

She prepared her home with traps and pushed steel wool in corners and crevices to keep rodents from entering.

“I can handle dead mice and mice,” she told CNN.

ABC journalist Lucy Thackeray introduces herself on Twitter as “a reluctant rodent reporter”. I posted a clip showing how he made makeshift mousetrap farms out of a silo that is quickly filled to the brim with thousands of mice.

https://twitter.com/LucyThack/status/1394622017920397329

In New South Wales, where the million-dollar city of Sydney is located, authorities have amassed something more deadly than mousetraps: 5,000 liters of one of the world’s deadliest chemicals for rat poisoning.

However, this has caused concern due to the risk of poisoning wild animals and plants CNN.

The warning: “After the mice come the snakes.”

The rat is an invasive species in Australia and it came to the country with colonists in the 18th century.

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However, domestic snakes are not picky and love to eat intruders.

“After the mice, come the snakes,” says pest control officer Gerard Dallo 9 news in Australia.

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